Aaron Stephan

Cement Houses and How to Build Them

September 9 - October 7



Portland-based sculptor Aaron Stephan’s Cement Houses and How to Build Them dialogues with ideas surrounding the American Dream of home ownership in the twentieth century, the collapse of the U.S. housing market at the beginning of the twenty-first century, and recent development booms across cities like Miami. With a one-man, concrete block-making device sold by Sears in the early 1900s—and used to produce building material for constructing one’s own home—the artist will produce hundreds of blocks and build the façade of a home in Locust Projects’ main space. Using the same blueprints packaged with the concrete block machine, Stephan’s construction process will explore the concrete block and the home as potent symbols of American idealism, and the shifting economic landscapes of the nation’s recent history.


Franky Cruz: Vivero

Vivero

September 9 - October 7



Miami-based artist Franky Cruz is a polymath whose artistic practice borrows from a diversity of interdisciplinary media. For his installation at Locust Projects, Cruz will don the hat of entomologist, cultivating butterflies from egg to chrysalis in an enclosed, vegetal environment he will construct in the back project space. As the butterflies emerge from their chrysalis, the umber and ochre secretions they release will absorb onto watercolor paper laid beneath. The butterflies, then released outdoors, will leave a trace of themselves across this unorthodox watercolor process.


Rootoftwo

Whithervanes

Opening September 2017



Locust Projects will host the U.S. debut of Whithervanes, a Knight Foundation-funded project by the Detroit-based experimental design duo rootoftwo (Cezanne Charles and John Marshall). Unlike traditional weathervanes, these four-foot tall, internet-connected headless chickens change color and direction in response to the climate of fear propagated by the media. Mounted on the roofs of three local buildings across downtown, the Design District and Biscayne Boulevard, these sculptures scan the Internet for alarmist keywords, covering topics from violence to economic crises to natural disasters.